SEMINARS & WORKSHOPS

PROFESSIONAL SEMINARS, WORKSHOPS, LECTURES, AND CLASSES DEVELOPED AND PRESENTED BY ALAN PERLMAN

Alan is quoted in the Chicago Tribune.

Business Communications: Theory and Practice (Wayne State University, Detroit MI; Oakland University, Rochester MI); 1979-80.

"Speechwriting in the Corporate Context," Public Relations Update, Detroit MI, 1982.

Fundamentals of Public Speaking; Executive Communications: Speech and Writing (D’Etre University, Grosse Pointe MI); 1982-83.

Business Writing (Burroughs Corp. After-Hours Education Program); 1981-83.

"Jobs Without Experience, Experience Without Jobs: Breaking the Vicious Cycle," Communications ’83 (careers conference).

"Sounds in Space — A Seminar in Effective Oral Presentation," Detroit Chapter, International Association of Business Communicators (IABC), November, 1983.

"Preparing Humanities Students for Business Careers: What Liberal-Arts Faculty Can Do" (Keynote Address, to faculty); "Business Careers for Liberal-Arts Graduates: Improving Your Chances (speech to students), Liberal Arts Careers Seminar, Bowling Green State University, April, 1985.

"Writing for the Tongue," IABC District 7 Conference, November, 1985.

"Employment Opportunities Outside the Classroom," Michigan College English Association, Annual Meeting, October, 1985.

"Speeches That Sing, Speeches That Sell: Insights into the Craft," National Association for Corporate Speaker Activities (NACSA), April, 1987.

"Tips on Effective Speechwriting," IABC/Detroit, March, 1989.

"The Instant Expert: Mastering the Technical Speech," NACSA, September, 1989.

"Words, Words, Words: Some Basic Truths About Symbols and Things," Keynote Address, Toastmasters International, November, 1989.

"Writing for the Big Guns," Detroit Producers Association, May, 1990.

"Power on the Podium: Coaching the Executive Speaker," Metro Detroit Speechwriters’ Forum, June, 1990.

"Those Troublesome Ceremonial Speeches: the Toast, the Dedication, the Introduction, and the Acceptance," Third, Fourth, Fifth Annual Speechwriters Conferences, November, 1990, 1991, 1992.

"How to Write a Speech," Ragan Communication Seminars (various cities), April-June, 1991.

"The Speech as an Instrument of Policy," Keynote Panel, Fourth Annual Speechwriters Conference, November, 1991.

"Soft Words for Hard Times: The Function of Euphemism in Corporate Communication," Panel Remarks, Corporate Communicators’ Conference, May, 1992.

"The Year’s Ten Worst Speeches — And What We Can Learn from Them," Fifth Annual Speechwriters Conference, November, 1992.

"Style: You’ve Either Got It or You Don’t — and How to Get It," Chicago Speechwriters Forum, October, 1993.

"Speechwriters of the World, You’re Needed!", Sixth Annual Speechwriters Conference, November, 1993.(with Jerry Tarver) "How to Write Speeches that Motivate," Sixth Annual Speechwriters Conference, November, 1993.

"To P.C. or Not P.C.," Public Relations Society of America, Greater O’Hare Chapter, February, 1994.

"In Pursuit of the Optimal Interview," Chicago Speechwriters Forum, Nov. 1, 1994.

"The Power and the Gory: Words Do Mean Something — Don’t They?", Chicago Speechwriters Forum, June, 1995.

"Some Components of ‘Cogent’ and ‘Memorable,’" Chicago Speechwriters Forum, January, 1996.

"On Libertarian Rhetoric," Chicago Speechwriters Forum, October, 1996.

"Creativity on Cue," Chicago Speechwriters Forum, July 7, 1998.

"Acquiring Quick Credibility," Chicago Speechwriters Forum, October 6, 1998.

"Language Variation and Change: A Speechwriter’s Primer," Chicago Speechwriters Forum, March 3, 1999.

"And Bingo Was Its Name-Oh: Buzzword Bingo and its Implications for Speechwriters," Chicago Speechwriters Forum, August 3, 1999.

"Writing Great Speeches," Toastmasters International Conference, Chicago, IL, August 19, 1999.

"The Visible Ghost: Speechwriting in the Corporate Context," Department of Communication Studies, West Chester University, West Chester, PA, October, 25, 1999.

"Reflect Your Speaker’s Personality in Your Speeches," Ragan Communications Speechwriting Conference, Washington, DC, Feb. 9, 2000.

"Writing Great Speeches," Diplomatic Toastmasters #4378, District 30, 10th Anniversary Celebration, Evanston, IL, March 19, 2001.

"World English: How to Communicate with an International Audience," International Association of Business Communicators, International Conference, Chicago, IL, June 11, 2002.

"The Language of Music and the Music of Language," Chicago Speechwriters Forum, September 9, 2003.

"When a Lawyer Needs a Linguist,” Association of Forensic Document Examiners, Milwaukee, WI, Nov. 8, 2009.


 

Recent Posts

  • Forensic linguistics featured in New Yorker piece - To introduce the next post, here’s my response to a New Yorker piece on forensic linguistics. The article is in the print version and at http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2012/07/23/120723fa_fact_hitt . Dear Editor, As a practicing forensic linguist, I thoroughly enjoyed your article on the profession – but with mixed feelings. It was gratifying to see forensic linguistics, which is not... Read more »
  • The forensic linguist and the Artful Dodger: Can people deliberately fake their writing style? - Perhaps 25% of the cases I handle involve the authorship of anonymous, disputed, or forged documents.  The client wants to know who’s writing those nasty, threatening emails or letters.  I typically ask the client for writing samples from the suspected author.  Sometimes there’s more than one suspect, and I have to decide which of them... Read more »
  • “Google” goes generic - Some years ago, right around this time of year, a geek site, as an April Fools prank, launched a new product — unicorn meat – which it called “the new white meat,” and lawyers for the National Pork Board issue a cease-and-desist order, because they’ve gone to great lengths to copyright “the other white meat”... Read more »
  • Stylistic analysis/stylometrics – a concise statement - The following description is taken from an affidavit by Gerald R. McMenamin, one of the leading scholars in the field; the affidavit – from Case 1:10-cv-00569-RJA -LGF Document 50 Filed 06/02/11 As part of his expert witness statement, McMenamin describes the theoretical and practical foundation of the method by which he examined documents and determined... Read more »
  • When a lawyer needs a linguist - When does a lawyer need a linguist? As Roger Shuy, one of the most pre-eminent forensic linguists, has observed, the interpretation and application of the law are overwhelmingly about language.  Thus, there are many situations in which the expertise of a linguist – someone trained in the precise description and analysis of language (but not... Read more »
  • Basis forensic skills: How text-sensitive are you? - A forensic linguist must be exquisitely sensitive to nuances of text.  Where a synonym exists, the very choice of each word represents a decision on the part of the author.  Superimposed upon that is the way toward is spelled, abbreviated or capitalized. Truly, a text is a tangle of choices. The following are intended to... Read more »
  • I was wrong: p.c. can go even lower - Just when I thought the absurdity of political correctness/perceived insult exemplified by the contrived controversy over the “lighter is better” beer commercial could not be topped, along comes p.c.’s most ludicrous artifact yet: new pronouns. A couple of days ago, I watched in shock and awe as Tucker Carlson interviewed a woman who explained them:... Read more »
  • Trump, Trump, Trump: desperately seeking synonyms - Charles Dickens is famous for giving his characters whimsical names that often reflect their personalities.  “Scrooge” is probably the best-known, unmistakably conveying a grasping miserliness in almost tangible terms. If Dickens had written about a vulgar, aggressive billionaire intent on seeking power, crushing his enemies, and emblazoning his name around the world, he could hardly... Read more »
  • “Lighter is better”: Political correctness hits a new low - I have been bitching about political correctness for decades (e.g., “Why we love to hate p.c.,” Toastmaster magazine, June 1996; copies available on request) to no avail, and it keeps getting worse.  The list of offensive words has grown and grown.  New terms have appeared – “trigger words,” “hate speech,” “micro-aggressions” — as grievance groups... Read more »
  • For a quick — but accurate — summary of political rhetoric, read this - This is as good a summary of political rhetoric as I’ve seen: “Political speeches are rarely occasions for truth-telling. But the good ones combine a description of shared reality with the expression of a vision, or with words of celebration. The mediocre ones consist of platitudes—well-intentioned but lacking the force of inspiration or recognition. And... Read more »