Alan M. Perlman, an academically trained career linguist, is a forensic expert who offers clients exceptional quality, experience, and expertise.  He is one of a small number of linguistics experts who assist the legal professions.

Like other forensic linguists, Dr. Perlman applies the principles and methods of linguistics to the language of legal proceedings, disputes, and documents.  (See Areas of Expertise below.)

He has a PhD in linguistics and more than 20 years of experience as an expert in forensic linguistics and the systematic analysis of language it requires.  His expertise represents a unique combination: a deep theoretical understanding of the workings of language…together with extensive experience in the application of linguistic principles to the analysis of language samples in order to assist attorneys, other legal professionals, law enforcement personnel, and others in understanding the linguistic issues that bear upon particular cases.

Dr. Perlman is a highly competent forensic expert witness who produces expert witness reports, depositions, and testimony that conform to the Daubert criteria and are legally and logically rigorous, as well as easily intelligible to both laymen and legal professionals.


 

Recent Posts

  • So, like, what’s up with this new use of “so”? - I like to watch language change the way many people like to see the seasons change – in fact, I like them both. Language change is the more unpredictable, yet, like the eternal revolution of heat and cold, it is inevitable and inexorable.   English existed as a language as early as the 5th century... Read more »
  • Reply to student: suggested authorship project - This rarest of all things — a legitimate letter from Nigeria (at least, I think — it didn’t ask for money) landed in my in-box:   Hello Dr. Alan. I am N__________from Nigeria. I am a student of Stylistics at the University of Ilorin, Nigeria. My professor requested for a term paper on ‘Forensic Stylistics’ and... Read more »
  • PS: Language judgments and prejudices - A PS to the previous post: We judge people by the way they speak, by which I mean we apply to them the generalizations we have gleaned from past associations with people who speak that way. I caution against being too hasty with these snap judgments. There are very good reasons why a non-stupid person... Read more »
  • No, I’m not peeved by people who can’t keep “their,” “they’re” and “there” straight - My sweet wife is peeved.  She wrote a Facebook post and started a thread.  Apparently others are peeved too.  As a linguist, I don’t get peeved. Well, sometimes I do.  But I try to observe and learn. [ I think there are some linguistic developments we can do without, but people have always thought that. ... Read more »
  • Linguist looks at 2nd Amendment - One thing I understand about New Hampshire, after eight years here, is that the state’s bold and famous motto, “live free or die,” refers mainly to the second half of the 2nd Amendment. A few years ago, its (not my) Legislature was considering laws that will make concealed-carry easier and (this one really make me... Read more »
  • Questions about the war on clickbait - “People tell us they don’t like stories that are misleading, sensational, or spammy. That includes clickbait headlines that are designed to get attention and lure visitors into clicking on a link.” Facebook blog So Facebook has declared war on clickbait.  The post defines three categories. “Spammy” I can understand. But we already have protection built... Read more »
  • What plagiarism is – and is not - I confidently predict that sometime in the next year, a public figure (or even someone you know) will be accused of plagiarism.  When that happens, read this first:   What plagiarism is — and is not A brief definition: plagiarism is knowingly appropriating another’s original words and/or ideas and presenting them as one’s own. As... Read more »
  • “Arrival” movie — an earnest but muddled attempt to render alien communication - Finally! A movie that makes an honest attempt to portray the way alien life-forms communicate — and actually stars a LINGUISTICS PROFESSOR who is tasked with figuring it out.   I was fascinated to see what they came up with. Previous efforts had the aliens either making unintelligible noises (as in “The Arrival,” a highly... Read more »
  • Push-words, Part II: The power of Push - Part II — The Power of Push From long years of observation, I’ve concluded that most people are not aware of the persuasive power of push-words – or of how blithely and frequently we call upon them. Most people believe that that their (portrayals of the) facts are THE facts. But serious observers of the language... Read more »
  • The most persuasive words in the language - How much would you pay for the most persuasive words in the language? And what do you think they would be? Are there really words that can get people to do anything you want? Reality check: there are no magic words, and we cannot always get people to do what we want with words alone... Read more »